Monthly Archives: September 2018

Everyone is losing their sh!t over Batman’s penis.

4A01F7CE-72EE-469F-B54D-FF7F893A094A The heft of his ample member weighs heavily on the Dark Knight’s  brooding soul.

Comics, like movies and games, is an ever evolving form of entertainment. As society changes, what is and isn’t considered acceptable changes with it. Sometimes, it seems, people feel things go too far. This isn’t the first time Comics has pushed the envelope, however.

Do you remember in the ‘60s when those amateurs Lee and O’Neil brought drugs into Spider-Man and Green Lantern comics? 

Disgraceful.

And then in the mid ‘80s when Squadron Supreme, Watchmen, and the Dark Knight Returns made politics even more predominate in comics than they already were? Those books even introduced mature themes—and one even showed a blue penis—repeatedly. They were written by some hacks named Gruenwald, Moore, and Miller. 

0B7E3FDA-E236-41E7-A3F2-D3CE986C40D0SJW vs. Far Right shenanigans.

Miller’s book was just the start of the end for Batman. What about that Arkham Asylum graphic novel that came out in 1989, wherein Clayface explains his tortured life by proclaiming he was not born, but instead was “shit into existence?“

1B4A9652-A524-4F62-81E1-832F10CD75C6 Oh, the humanity.

That one was written by some nobody named Morrison who I’m sure never went anywhere. Remember how that mature readers’ book ruined Batman, forever?

Oh, wait.

In this age, everyone has to be outraged about what is being done to their beloved characters (“Not MY Luke Skywalker,” anyone?) Social media helps facilitate this because everyone feels powerful while hiding behind their computer or phone screen. There are no obvious consequences (although that seems to be changing).

Comic and film franchises can and should try new things without violating the old ones. A mature line doesn’t detract from the regular one, and vise versa.

Here’s how it works—you don’t like it, don’t buy it. 

—Andrew E.C. Gaska

P.S.

…and now, the batarang:

6B3CD29E-EFBC-4B5F-A956-E31D53461550Peniacal.

UPDATE: Due to public outcry, DC has neutered the Batman. All reprints will no longer showcase his penis—it has been been erased from existence.

Good job, heroes. I hope you’re happy.

 

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By Your Command—So Say We All

AA95F3F7-DAA4-40E7-9B4B-E5B4A5457AFDYesterday was the 40th Anniversary of Battlestar Galactica. 

More than a sci-fi shoot’ em up in any incarnation, Battlestar Galactica has always been about both the struggle to escape overwhelming odds and a people’s right to survive. It’s about those being persecuted for their race—be it human or Cylon.

Frighteningly, there are still a lot of lessons to be learned from that in today’s world.

Busy with my new job and reflecting on the loss of the ineffable Richard Hatch (from a year and a half ago), I forwent any formal post until now.

This morning, I feel renewed and inspired—so have chosen to post a piece of Battlestar art that is often overlooked—created by the late great Frank Frazetta as concept art for the show some 40 yahrens ago.

Happy Belated, Battlestar.

May we see you continue to spread your message of hope in television and film form, as well as all other media.

Remember, there are always be those who believe.

As Richard would no doubt now say,

Keep the Faith.

Yours,

Andrew E.C. Gaska

Remember that time 19 years ago when the moon blasted out of orbit?

6AC98CBC-5C47-4567-A407-742DC7353C05Sept 13th, 1999:

A nuclear accident on the moon blasts it out of orbit, through a space warp, and careening into the cosmos.

311 brave souls survive on Moonbase Alpha, searching the stars for a new home.

SPACE:1999 was a 1974 Sci-Fi television series starring Martin Landau (of Ed Wood fame) and Barbara Bain (of Mission Impossible, along with Martin).

The show had a lot going for it. The special effects efforts by SFX wizard Brian Johnson led to his work on Star Wars. Along with Landau and Bain, it had the amazing Barry Morse heading up the cast. Joan Collins, Christopher Lee, and Peter Cushing all guest starred.

It was to be a Star Trek like series with a 2001 asthetic and tone. While the first season contains many gems, the show was too cerebral for most audiences of the time and was transformed into an action adventure format for season two. At first too adult and then too child-like, the series couldn’t find its footing and was cancelled after year two.

My first graphic novel based on the series was released in 2012 and was called Space:1999 – Aftershock and Awe. The second is sold out and getting harder to find every day.

And yes, there is a new series of SPACE:1999 graphic novels by me on the way.

I have limited copies of Aftershock and Awe available at the $25 cover price plus $6 domestic shipping (FB message me for foreign shipping). All books direct from the author are signed. Please remember to include your shipping address and whatever dedication you’d like. You can order by PAYPAL at soniamexcite@paypal.com.

And please, take a moment to celebrate the 44th anniversary of this sci-fi classic, and the 6,935th day since the moon left earth orbit.

Andrew E.C. Gaska

8AFA9AC1-3B3C-4606-97E2-F88AA9073B29